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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> i still like it here. i just want us to be safer. >> reporter: you can't blame samuels for thinking her complex was, indeed, safer after a string of assaults earlier this summer, police arrested the man they say was responsible, antonio mouton. he now sits in jail, held there by $12 million bail. what's more, following the assaults, the complex's management increased the number of security guards working at the park regency. still, at around 6:00 last night, a 27-year-old woman called the sheriff's office to report she had been sexually assaulted. >> as she opened her door and entered her apartment, someone came in behind her and forced his way in. >> reporter: the contra costa sheriff's department believes this is not evidence that the park regency complex is unsafe. they do, after all, have security guards, a neighborhood watch, and security cameras. what this latest assault proves to them, though, is that no one, regardless of their circumstances should ever take their safety for granted. >> the bottom line is you can never lower your guard, and this type of incident can happen a
bystanders. the fire department tells us they were able to find one woman in her 40s, still not identified. there are two other victims still in the plane in six feet of water at the lagoon. one said to be the pilot, the other thought to be a 91-year-old man who started a steel company in east palo alto more than 50 years ago. this kind of plane can hold up to eight people. he saw the plane just after takeoff and quickly knew it was in trouble. >>> i noticed the aircraft pitch up abruptly to a very high angle of attack, then appeared to level off and appeared as if he was stalling and then recovered, and i thought good recovery. and then he made a right turn, and the bank continued to increase well past 60 degrees. and just after he did that he pitched over, did a complete role and then nosedived into the surface. >> oh, yeah? >> the national transportation safety board is joining in the search this evening. crews tell us they've been hampered most of the afternoon by among other things, oil that has leaked in the water from the plane. we will continue to bring you up to dat
what a way to end the summer. a hot, sunny day for most of the bay. don't get too used to it, if anything this year has proven, once you get used to something it's going to change and a cool change is coming our way. a significant temperature drop in the next few days, rob is swreho to show what to expect. hey, rob. >>> this summer, it seems like we've only had five or six hot days and today was one of them. san jose, 92 degrees. it is scorching around the south bay. look at the humidity, way down and bone dry, 13%. as we head north, winds are picking off and we're cooling off at 83 degrees. san francisco, the sea breeze is cranking up. you can see 79 degrees and northwest wind at 17 miles an hour an the fog that's moving up around slee pass in area. the low to the north will drop the temperatures big-time and may toss drizzle our way. we'll have a look at the rapid changes coming your way in a few minutes. tom? >>> thank you, for california law enforcement this labor day has been busier than last. too many people are drinking and driving. as of this morning, california offic
for us right now. steve? >> reporter: lisa, thanks. good evening. the blown section of the san bruno pipeline is here in washington, the ntsb is in the middle of its investigation. but now the pressure is on pg&e to alter its system immediately. in the hearing here in washington, up on capitol hill today, chris johns, the head of pg&e says he's already lowered the pressure of the natural gas in his pipelines that run through populated areas. he's inviting congress to require big gas lines to be moved out of residential neighborhoods. but a clash came on ougauto mat shutoff valves. senator barbara boxer literally sniffed at that. >> you would agree there would have been a shutoff valve, we would have averted the disaster. >> if there were a remote controlled shutoff valve in there, the gas flow would have stopped faster by the time our people got there. >> reporter: so the challenge is laid down. will pg&e make its very, very expensive upgrades and switch to automatic shutoff valves in all of these high-risk areas. about 3,600 miles of pipeline we're told. and do it immediately. the c
ellis shows us, some educators say charter schools are not worth their weight in results. >> noble academy charter school in euclid, ohio, has 240 students, a waiting list and 100% of its students have passed the state's reading test. >> i can say it is mostly from the help of the teachers and the support of the parents. >> reporter: charter schools are public schools that are federally funded but privately run. 5,000 charter schools operate in 39 states and washington, d.c., serving more than 1.5 million students and 300,000 more are on waiting lists. >> it is that partnership between parents and teachers in the community to come together in an area where maybe traditional public education has failed. >> reporter: but another 11 states don't allow charters at all. opponents of charter schools say taxpayer money should be used to fix traditional public schools rather than creating charter schools which have less federal oversight and often require students to win a lottery to attend. diane ravage, the former assistant secretary of education under the george h.w. bush administration
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)